Reel

LAWMAKERS - LM 146 - "Show Open"

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Audio:
Location:
489407_1_1
Yes
United States
Year Shot:
Video:
Timecode:
1984  (Actual Year)
Color
19:59:35 - 20:00:23
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Original Film:
HD:
11254
LM 146
N/A
WETA credit, sponsor, and title sequence.

LAWMAKERS - LM 146 - "Show Topics"

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Audio:
Location:
489407_1_2
Yes
United States
Year Shot:
Video:
Timecode:
1984  (Actual Year)
Color
20:00:23 - 20:00:49
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Original Film:
HD:
11254
LM 146
N/A
Show host Paul Duke, and reporters Cokie Roberts and Linda Wertheimer in studio. Duke lists show topics: Central America policy; new civil rights issues; and attempts to control credit costs.

LAWMAKERS - LM 146 - "Central America Policy"

Clip#:
Audio:
Location:
489407_1_3
Yes
Washington, DC, United States
Year Shot:
Video:
Timecode:
1984  (Actual Year)
Color
20:00:49 - 20:02:32
Tape Master:
Original Film:
HD:
11254
LM 146
N/A
Show host Paul Duke introduces report on the Central America policy debate in the U.S. House of Representatives. Newly-elected Salvadorean President José Napoleón Duarte entering Congressional Committee chamber, shaking hands; lights and cameras set up. Duke (VO) explains the purpose of Duarte’s visit, what aid was approved and rejected. House minority leader Robert Michel argues it's wrong to encourage the Contras to fight "tyranny," then pull the plug on aid. Representative William Broomfield (R-MI) argues the U.S. is obligated to follow through on promises. Rep. Michael Barnes (D-MD) argues the public is clearly opposed to sending military aid to Contras. Rep. Michael Shannon (D-MA) argues the U.S. should stand for peace, justice, and self-determination in world, but America’s Nicaraguan policy flies in the face of those principles and values. Duke, back in the studio, says the House vote was strongly against Contra aid, suggesting the House is opposed to C.I.A. activities in Nicaragua. The House also voted to ban the use of American soldiers in Central America.

LAWMAKERS - LM 146 - "Civil Rights Bill of 1984"

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Audio:
Location:
489407_1_4
Yes
United States
Year Shot:
Video:
Timecode:
1984  (Actual Year)
Color
20:02:32 - 20:05:47
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Original Film:
HD:
11254
LM 146
N/A
Reporter Cokie Roberts on the new Civil Rights Bill of 1984, states that Republicans are upset the Reagan administration is opposed to bill designed to reverse a Supreme Court decision pertaining to sex discrimination. Grove City College (Pennsylvania) with young Caucasian male and female students walking on campus. Roberts (VO) states Grove City had sued the federal government after funds cut for Grove City’s failure to enter a nondiscrimination agreement. U.S. Supreme Court Building exterior. Roberts explains court ruling that discrimination in one area does not disqualify an institution from federal funds in all areas. Young male African-American college student walking along sidewalk toward campus building. Floor of the U.S. House of Representatives chamber. Roberts states 414 House members voted for resolution favoring cutting federal funding to schools for discrimination in any program. Representative Claudine Schneider (R-RI) in office, says new legislation will eliminate technicalities in law. Roberts (VO) details proposed law under consideration in the House. Grove City college, male and female students and faculty walking around campus. Two elderly Caucasian men walking through crosswalk. NAACP Executive Director Benjamin Hooks standing across street from Capitol Building; Hooks says new bill's broad base makes it politically hard to beat. U.S. President Ronald Reagan answering a female reporter's question by arguing the new law would be federally intrusive on local and state government in any manner of ways that are unintended by the Civil Right Act. Roberts (VO) mentions President Reagan’s stance upsets moderate Republicans like Rep. Schneider. Rep. Schneider says the Republican legacy is one of civil rights.

LAWMAKERS - LM 146 - "Civil Rights Bill of 1984"

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Audio:
Location:
489407_1_5
Yes
United States
Year Shot:
Video:
Timecode:
1984  (Actual Year)
Color
20:05:47 - 20:08:36
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HD:
11254
LM 146
N/A
Adult men and women in a U.S. House of Representatives Committee meeting. Asst Attorney General William Bradford Reynolds testifying that the proposed civil rights bill is too intrusive to local affairs. Representative Gary Ackerman (D-NY) questions Mr. Reynolds. House Sub-Committee Chairman Don Edwards (D-CA) stating to the committee that the Reagan Administration is outside of the rest of American thought in its stance on the bill. Reporter Cokie Roberts standing in the committee chamber with House Representative F.J. Sensenbrenner (R-WI), who calls President Reagan’s statements "scare tactics." Rep. Steve Gunderson (R-WI) says politically a Civil Rights bill is a no-win situation for Republicans. Rep. Sensenbrenner says Republicans are independent thinkers and the bill will pass regardless of the President's stance. Rep. Claudine Schneider (R-RI) says she will continue to work with the White House on the bill's behalf.

LAWMAKERS - LM 146 - "Studio Recap"

Clip#:
Audio:
Location:
489407_1_6
Yes
Washington, DC, United States
Year Shot:
Video:
Timecode:
1984  (Actual Year)
Color
20:08:36 - 20:10:41
Tape Master:
Original Film:
HD:
11254
LM 146
N/A
Host Paul Duke with reporters Cokie Roberts and Linda Wertheimer in studio. Duke asks Roberts if the President’s stance will change or will he veto the bill. Roberts believes the likeliest scenario has Senate Republicans altering the language of the bill to compromise with the President. Duke notes that people are baffled over the administration's continued battles over civil rights with its own party, cites examples. Wertheimer believes Congressional Republicans answer to different constituents than the President, adds that she has witnessed on the House floor this week a concerted effort to “punt” controversial issues to June. Roberts summarizes the House of Representatives debates and votes on the issues regarding Central America as well as the humorous debate on whether the U.S. military will allow religious Jews to wear their skull caps under their combat helmets.